Breach of Contract

Hill v. Simmons

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In this unpublished opinion, the First District held that a complaint against a lawyer was properly dismissed as time-barred.   The court held that the plaintiff’s claims for fraud, aiding and abetting fraud, breach of fiduciary duty and conspiracy were properly subject to the two year attorney statute of limitations, and that the statute began to run when the plaintiff learned of the lawyer’s alleged misrepresentations.

Hill v. Simmons, 2017 IL App (1st) 160577-U

(This is for informational purposes and is not legal advice.)

Recent Illinois Case: First American Title Insurance Co. v. Dundee Reger LLC v. Hallam

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The Northern District of Illinois addressed third-party claims against a law firm asserting legal malpractice and, in the alternative, breach of contract and promissory estoppel.  The third-party defendant moved to dismiss the breach of contract and promissory estoppel claims as duplicative of the legal malpractice claim.  The court held that, under Illinois law, duplicative breach of fiduciary duty claims should be dismissed but breach of contract claims, even if duplicative, may be plead in the alternative.  The motion to dismiss was denied.

(This is for informational purposes and is not legal advice.)

First American Title Insurance Co. v. Dundee Reger, LLC et al. v. Peter G. Hallam, 2016 WL 1359374

Recent Illinois Case: Navar v. Tribler, Orpett and Meyer, P.C.

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In this unpublished opinion, the Appellate Court affirmed the dismissal of three claims against lawyers. A breach of contract claim was properly dismissed because the plaintiff failed to identify a specific contract term that was breached. The malpractice claim was properly dismissed because the complained of acts involved judgment and not malpractice. The fraud claim was properly dismissed because predictions of future events do not constitute fraud. The Appellate Court also affirmed the trial court’s refusal to allow a further amendment.

Navar v. Tribler, Orpett and Meyer, P.C., 2015 IL App (1st) 142641-U

(This is for informational purposes and is not legal advice.)

Recent Illinois Case: Banks v. Casson

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This recent case involved a dispute between attorneys over failure to pay a lawyer referral fee.  The attorneys never obtained signed written consent from the client for the referral fee, as required by Rule 1.5 of the Illinois Rules of Professional Conduct. Nonetheless, the attorney who was allegedly owed the fees filed a lawsuit, seeking damages for breach of fiduciary duty (under a joint venture theory) and fraud.  The First District affirmed dismissal, holding that the breach of fiduciary duty claim failed because the “joint venture” was based on an unenforceable agreement.   The fraud claim was time barred.

Banks v. Casson, 2015 IL App (1st) 133141-U

(This is for informational purposes and is not legal advice.)

Harvery v. Connor, 85 Ill. App. 3d 1061, 407 N.E.2d 879 (1st Dist. 1980)

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Harvery v. Connor, 85 Ill. App. 3d 1061, 407 N.E.2d 879 (1st Dist. 1980) (attorney not liable for client’s breach of contract signed by attorney as agent)